Vitamin E Linked to Higher Prostate Cancer Risk

A new study finds a link between vitamin E – a popular dietary supplement – and an increased risk of prostate cancer. In 2001, scientists launched the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT), to test the widely-held belief that the two supplements might help or prevent disease.

Study Shows Vitamin E Increases Prostate Cancer Risk

A number of medical studies over the years suggested that vitamin E, taken as a dietary supplement, might help prevent prostate cancer.  But new research finds not only that the earlier studies were wrong, but that taking vitamin E can actually be harmful. For years, many doctors thought taking vitamin E could help prevent many

Veggies Help Fight Genetic Heart Attack Risk

A new study finds that a diet high in fruits and vegetables can reduce the danger of heart disease among people at highest risk. Scientists found healthier eating can turn off the risk gene and mitigate the risk of heart attack. Researchers studied a large group of more than 27,000 people whose genetic makeup, or

Study: Vitamin D is Powerful Weapon Against TB

Vitamin D plays a critical role in fighting infection and now scientists say that it may be a powerful weapon against tuberculosis. In a study reported in the journal Science Translational Medicine, researchers studied how T-cells – a kind of white blood cell that fights infection – are especially effective against the bacteria that cause

Improved TB Vaccine in Works as Global Infection Rates Fall

With tuberculosis infection rates falling around the world, health officials are pressing to build on those gains. One project in development aims to create a better vaccine to stop the disease for good. The latest World Health Organization report on tuberculosis shows the number of people contracting the disease fell to 8.8 million in 2010,

WHO: Tuberculosis Declines For First Time

The World Health Organization says the number of people worldwide getting tuberculosis declined last year for the first time. WHO statistics published Tuesday show the number of people who became sick with the disease dropped to 8.8 million in 2010. The number of people who died last year from TB fell to 1.4 million.

WHO: Despite Record-Low Infections, TB Funding a Concern

The World Health Organization says the number of people worldwide getting tuberculosis declined last year for the first time, but experts warn this progress could be undone by cuts in funding, especially amid global economic turmoil. W.H.O. statistics published Tuesday show the number of people who became sick with the disease dropped to 8.8 million

WHO: Treatment for Mental Health Inadequate and Under-funded

The World Health Organization is calling on governments to increase services for people suffering from mental, neurological and substance use disorders. A report released to coincide with World Mental Health Day, which falls on October 10, finds countries all over the world spend very little on the treatment of mental illness.

Thyroid Examinations Begin of All Fukushima Children

Japanese doctors on Sunday began checking the thyroids of 360,000 children in Fukushima Prefecture, site of a nuclear reactor meltdown during the days following Japan’s earthquake and tsunami in March. The examinations, on a scale medical officials are calling unprecedented, come amid concern that the cancer rate in the area could surge. Ultrasonic thyroid examinations

Natural Substance Reverses Diabetes in Mice

Researchers used a substance, made naturally in the body, to reverse diabetes in mice, a finding which could be key to rolling back Type 2 diabetes. The enzyme, called NMN (nicotinamide mononucleotide), restored normal blood sugar metabolism in diabetic laboratory mice. Washington University medical school Professor Shin-ichiro Imai, focuses his research on aging and longevity.